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Category Archives: architecture

Dad’s Book, Singing and A Discovery

A delightful surprise today when a friend rang to say that she had seen a poster for a musical play of one of my Dad’s books! The Fate of Jeremy Visick is to be performed in a couple of weeks and of course, we now have tickets. The book was first adapted by Judith Cook and we all came down from Yorkshire to see the Premiere at The Barbican Theatre in Plymouth in 1990! It is so lovely to know that my Dad’s work is still being appreciated. We love the poster and think Dad would have approved.

Stage Struck and The Fate of Jeremy Visick

Thirteen singers from my two choirs met at the building site that is The Hall for Cornwall to entertain the dignitaries who were being shown around. We sang in the stair-well and the acoustics were brilliant. The audience in their hard hats and hi-vis jackets were very appreciative.

Ingleheart Singers and Suitcase Singers

In the process of the building works, a beautiful gate has been discovered. It was buried inside a wall and dates from before 1914 so is well over 100 years old.  The plans have been altered a little to make sure this discovery is integrated into the new building.

Delightful discovery

 

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Crenelations, Gulls and Sun on the Water

More sun today! Porthtowan was our destination for a bitterly cold walk along the beach, arriving through the valley past the old workings of the Tywarnhayle Copper Mines.

Tywarnhayle Copper Mine with the unusual crenelations at the top of the chimney

Birds on the beach

Low sun on the water at Porthtowan

 

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Winter Trees, Concert and Door Latch

I love seeing the structure of winter trees.

Winter trees

The Suitcase singers have done the last concert of the season in the beautiful old Male Church. This photo was taken by a member of the audience.

The Suitcase Singers

Mabe Church dates from 1400, the stone work is fabulous and the door latch heavy and dramatic.

Old door latch on the Church door

 

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Gaudi, Wisdom and Garden

Where were we? Click on any photo for more detail.

Wow!

I loved these words found in the Grandbabies’ nursery.

Live all the days of your life / Live every day to the full – Jonathan Swift, found in the Nursery

A very pleasing garden in the Primary School, where all classes take their turn to cultivate and to share in the produce.

School garden

 

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Caro Emerald, Staircase and The Hoe

We were in Plymouth for the weekend to see Caro Emerald and her performance was electrifying! The whole audience were on their feet, dancing, clapping and singing! Just look at the flower on this picture disc – it looks like the one I featured a couple of days ago, Fascicularia bicolor!

Picture disc

Caro Emerald ended the show with a rousing rendition of A Night Like This

Our B&B was delightful, in a house called NumberOne, built in the 1850s for a Royal Navy Admiral. The staircase in this Regency house was just gorgeous!

Handrail

After a delicious breakfast, we went for a bitterly cold walk on The Hoe in bright sunshine.

 

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Day 7 – Mesa Verde, 700 Years Tour

Monday 10th September 2018

A four hour tour in the company of an erudite archaeologist/anthropologist made for a fascinating morning touring the Mesa Verde sites, looking at homes that had been lived in over the last 700 years. The community of Cliff Palace must have been quite something. Do click on the rather small photo to see the detail of Cliff Palace and the tiny people, braver than I, who climbed down to the palace and climbed up again via three 10′ ladders up the cliffside!

A delicious cocktail completed a brilliant day!

 

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Road Trip Day 6 – Mesa Verde, Far View

Sunday 9th September 2018

Mesa Verde was a looming green mountain and a cracking drive of hairpin bends up to the top where we were to stay for three nights. From the National Parks website: “Mesa Verde National Park was established in 1906 to preserve and interpret the archeological heritage of the Ancestral Pueblo people who made it their home for over 700 years, from 600 to 1300 CE. Today, the park protects nearly 5,000 known archeological sites, including 600 cliff dwellings. These sites are some of the most notable and best preserved in the United States.”

https://www.nps.gov/meve/learn/historyculture/mt_far_view_sites.htm

 

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