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Category Archives: Tin mining history

Mining Memorial Sunday and A Cosy Afternoon

We didn’t do the Pilgrimage from Wheal Bassett Stamp House to Wheal Euny and down to the Church  but waited in the mizzle at St Euny Church for the singers and walkers. The rain was such that the rest of the event, some scheduled for outdoors, was all moved into the Church. Mining Memorial Sunday is to recognise the history and the importance of our town and surrounding areas in the mining of tin and copper and to give thanks. Perthi Kov, our small theatre company who put together ‘Until the Day Break’ (lots of information elsewhere in my blog) were asked if any of our characters would like to reprise their story telling to help bring the history alive. Three of those stories which involved miners taking their skills abroad were retold and were very well received:  Mary Angove Gill whose story I researched and wrote, J W Goldsworthy, whose story I researched and a colleague wrote and Catherine Tonkin Burrowes and one of our singers reprised the final song which the congregation joined in with. It was a very moving service followed by Cornish Pasties and a Cream Tea!

Jeannette, Mandy, Florence and Keith

We liked the final hymn which we hadn’t heard before, the last verse in Cornish being sung with particular gusto!

The final hymn

After getting thoroughly wet, though not as wet as the walkers, and then chilled in the Church, we have spent the afternoon cosied up in the sitting room, stuck into our books. I am re-reading The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley – just as good this time around.

 

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Pednandrea Chimney, Hollyhocks and Autumn Leaves

A pretty peachy cloud was hovering over Pednandrea Chimney as we walked down to buy some milk.

Pednandrea chimney stack (the Cornish name means ‘At the head of the town’) can be seen for miles around

Coming back up the lane we saw pink Hollyhocks over a neighbours fence and  burnished golden leaves along the path.

Hollyhocks in the evening light

Wet Autumn leaves on the last day of August

 

Fountain, Feeding and Engine Houses

Our copper fountain has been installed at last. It is in the last patch of the garden to be sorted and I have all the ferns and shade lovers ready to plant around it. I love the sound of the trickling water.  We put the pebbles into each cup to enhance the trickle sound.

Fountain trickles

We walked up the back around The Great Flat Lode tonight and were amused by the cows eating in tandem and the calf having a good feed. We are so lucky to be able to walk out of the front door and into such spaces.

Calf having supper

Munching grass in unison

Along the trail is Wheal Uny and another engine house. From one angle they looked very like the ones Dad had sketched many years ago (see yesterday’s post)  but aren’t quite right. The mast would have gone up much later and the bushes have grown but we think we have to keep looking.

Engine houses up on the Flat Lode Trail – the ones Dad sketched?

 

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Frame 2

I was amused to catch a mother catching her son framed in a window of Wheal Coates, an old engine house on the cliffs at Chapel Porth, Cornwall.

At Wheal Coates, Cornwall

At Wheal Coates, Cornwall

For others in this Challenge, click here.

 

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Wheal Amelia, Butterfly and A Magpie

Cornwall is scattered with old engine houses, relics of the days when tin and copper were mined here. This one I saw today used to be called Wheal Amelia but as you will see from the plaque there is more to its history than that.

Wheal Amelia

Wheal Amelia

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An unusual butterfly landed on the shed roof today. It turns out to be a Wall Brown, Lasiommata Megera.

 Wall Brown Lasiommata megera


Wall Brown
Lasiommata megera

A Magpie landed on our beautiful sculpture, Fledgling, by Richard Holliday, to wait for its turn at the feeders.DSCN4676

 

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Baby Bird, Kindness and Romance

Only a short walk today and only a quick view of this little bird which we think is a Robin as he had a bright breast that we saw only briefly as he hopped off under the hedge.DSCN4049

These words came my way the other day. Kindness must be the most important quality of any human being. When I first told my parents that I had fallen in love, their first question was, “Is he kind?” Ah, kindness

For those of you  with romance in your hearts and those of you who have been following my posts about the marvellous Man Engine, the following is a true story.  The instigator of the whole fantastical adventure with a mission to tell everyone of the history of Cornish mining chose the end of last event to propose to his girlfriend and the Man Engine went down on one knee! Isn’t that just perfect?! This photo was taken by Mike Newman.

A proposal of marriage

 

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The Garden Year, Carrots and A Village Marker

All around the scanning department at our hospital are beautifully crafted verses from The Garden Year. June is etched into glass and couldn’t be photographed but here is October – and the whole poem.

The Garden Year

Sara Coleridge

January brings the snow,
Makes our feet and fingers glow.

February brings the rain,
Thaws the frozen lake again.

March brings breezes, loud and shrill,
To stir the dancing daffodil.

April brings the primrose sweet,
Scatters daisies at our feet.

May brings flocks of pretty lambs
Skipping by their fleecy dams.

June brings tulips, lilies, roses,
Fills the children’s hands with posies.

Hot July brings cooling showers,
Apricots, and gillyflowers.

August brings the sheaves of corn,
Then the harvest home is borne.

Warm September brings the fruit;
Sportsmen then begin to shoot.

Fresh October brings the pheasant;
Then to gather nuts is pleasant.

Dull November brings the blast;
Then the leaves are whirling fast.

Chill December brings the sleet,
Blazing fire, and Christmas treat.

October

October

2   I called in at The Old  Market Chacewater,  on our way home from Truro. It is a delight, a treasure trove of beautiful vegetables, delicious bread and pastries – I bought a Pain-au-raisin and a Chocolate Croissant as well as the gorgeous carrots.

Multi-coloured carrots

Multi-coloured carrots

3 Singing tonight  was, as always, so good for the soul and lifted my spirits – a boost that I brought home to share with the lovely Mr S.  The village that we sing in has put an eye-catching little treat on the roadside as one enters the village.

A delight to see

A representation of the iconic engine houses that are all over this part of Cornwall

 

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