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Weekly Photo Challenge: Family

20 Jan

This is the gravestone to the Martin Family and is in Gwennap Churchyard, Cornwall. It is the  story of the family on this stone that inspired my Dad to write his best novel, “Jeremy Visick”. You could click on the photo to make it bigger and to make it easier to read. I’ve put the text under the photo too.  Do read it through – what a life for that family, for Ann who lost so many children and her husband – and, indeed for many families in Cornwall in the 1800s.

The Martin Gravestone

The Martin Gravestone

 

IN

LOVING MEMORY

OF

JOHN MARTIN

OF TING TANG IN THIS

PARISH WHO WAS KILLED

BY AN ACCIDENT IN WHEAL

 PINK MINE 1ST MAY 1848

AGED 51 YEARS

ALSO OF ANN, WIFE OF

THE ABOVE DIED 16 DEC 1866

AGED 65 YEARS.

ALSO OF PETHERICK CROSSMAN

3RD SON OF THE ABOVE

WHO DIED 1ST JULY 1829

AGED 13 MONTHS

ALSO LAVENIA ANDREW 4TH

DAUGHTER OF THE ABOVE

WHO DIED 9TH NOVEMBER, 1843

AGED 14 MONTHS.

ALSO WILLIAM PETHERICK, 2ND

SON OF THE ABOVE WHO WAS

KILLED BY AN ACCIDENT IN

WHEAL JEWEL MINE 19 DEC 1844

AGED 18 YEARS.

CAPTAIN NICHOLAS ANDREW

THE 5TH SON. DIED 14 FEB 1872

FROM INJURIES RECEIVED IN THE

VARZIA MINES PORTUGAL AND

WAS THERE INTERRED. AGED 37 YEARS.

ALSO, JOHN ELDEST SON OF THE ABOVE

WHO DIED 5TH JUNE 1876.

AGED 51 YEARS.

EDWIN THOMAS, YOUNGEST SON,

WHO DIED 22ND JAN 1878

AGED 33 YEARS.

I’ve read the novel at least a dozen times as it was on the reading list for the children I was teaching. (It was studied at schools all over the country, not only at the school I was teaching at!) We used to study this gravestone and the pupils would write a diary from Ann’s point of view. Their empathy was wonderful and the diaries often quite heartbreaking.

For others in this challenge, click here

 

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23 responses to “Weekly Photo Challenge: Family

  1. Joy Mortimer

    June 2, 2020 at 7:34 am

    This book never left me. I borrowed it from my school library, back in the eighties, in New Zealand, at the age of 11. Today I googled the title to see if it’s still in print because I still think of it at random times (and I discovered your blog). The book is kind of like my coming of age story. It hit me hard. I was so moved. I can only imagine how emotional it would have been for you seeing the stage performance! Wow! How wonderful for you (and your dad.)

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • mybeautfulthings

      June 2, 2020 at 12:23 pm

      That is so very lovely to hear. Thank you so much for taking the time to tell me what Dad’s story meant to you. It was very moving indeed to see Dad’s story brought to life on stage and to realise how many more were being touched by his tale of Jeremy and Matthew. Happy that you found my blog through searching for Jeremy too – that’s serendipity! 🙂

      Like

       
  2. thewomenwhomademe

    August 14, 2017 at 1:07 pm

    Loved this book as a child, and re-read it this weekend – which is why a miner’s widow is now a feature of today’s women’s social history blog. I love that your father got the readers and the children to think about this history from a woman’s perspective.

    Liked by 1 person

     
  3. Adi Thomas

    July 26, 2015 at 10:04 pm

    Hi, I met your Dad many years ago when I was attending a book fair at Richard Lander in Truro and he read an extract from Jeremy Visick for us. I was only no more than 10 or 11 at the time. One thing I always remember however is him telling a story of how he had been in Truro and spotted a man working on his roof and felt drawn to see what he was doing, as he got closer he realised that the man was actually Richard Lander stood on his column at the top of Lemon Street. The moral he drew was that perception can always be misleading and you should always investigate for yourself. It is something that I have always remembered and felt was important.
    I still have my copy of Jeremy Visick and when my children are old enough will share it with them.

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • mybeautfulthings

      July 27, 2015 at 5:26 am

      How lovely to read this! Thank you for this lovely memory. Do you know the places mentioned in the book? I have long had fantasies about The Jeremy Visick Trail! Lovely to hear from you. 🙂

      Like

       
  4. kerlund74

    January 21, 2014 at 8:18 pm

    That is what I call a family.

    Liked by 1 person

     
  5. Photography Journal Blog

    January 21, 2014 at 12:53 pm

    This is a great take on the challenge.

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • mybeautfulthings

      January 21, 2014 at 1:42 pm

      Thanks. It had me stumped at first and then the day before I saw the amazing gravestone at Mylor and remembered this one…. 🙂

      Like

       
      • Photography Journal Blog

        January 22, 2014 at 12:02 pm

        Sometimes, it is great when the challenges have you stumped at first 🙂

        Like

         
        • mybeautfulthings

          January 22, 2014 at 12:22 pm

          I agree. The challenge always has me thinking for a few days. It’s rare that I can respond immediately. 🙂

          Like

           
  6. babyjill7...Marilyn Griffin

    January 20, 2014 at 9:55 pm

    just lovely…the story of a family on a tombstone…the time and effort…
    I imagine the children loved the thought that your father wrote the book they were reading…Excellent post!

    Like

     
    • mybeautfulthings

      January 20, 2014 at 10:43 pm

      They did! They loved it even more (and so did I ) when he came in to talk to them about the novel and to inspire them with their own writing!

      Like

       
  7. Peri's Spice Ladle

    January 20, 2014 at 8:53 pm

    What an appropriate posting for the ‘family’ challenge. Your dad’s novel seems really interesting:)

    Liked by 1 person

     
  8. btacoma

    January 20, 2014 at 6:58 pm

    I have been tracing my family history for many years and also my sister-in-law’s family. She has coal mining careers in her genealogy, both in England and in the USA. I looked at the book on Amazon an will order it today. Looking forward to reading more than just the first 6 pages.

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • mybeautfulthings

      January 20, 2014 at 10:46 pm

      So pleased you want to order the book! Do let me know how you enjoy it. We are able to visit many of the places mentioned in the novel as well as the Martin tombstone.
      Thank you very much for calling in and taking the time to comment. 🙂

      Like

       
      • btacoma

        January 25, 2014 at 6:08 pm

        I was hoping to get it in a Kindle version, but Amazon only has paper. Have not ordered it yet but I will order it soon. Looking forward to reading this book.

        Liked by 1 person

         
  9. Charly Makray-Rice

    January 20, 2014 at 4:23 pm

    Astounding and deeply moving. I’m in my third year of tracing my husband’s early British and colonial American genealogy so this record of a family is beautiful.Mining is such dangerous business.

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • mybeautfulthings

      January 20, 2014 at 4:40 pm

      Thank you so much for calling in and taking the time to comment. Family history is so fascinating isn’t it. I’ve made a start on ours but it is very time consuming and I get caught up with all my other activities!
      Thanks for the follow too. 🙂

      Like

       
  10. ladysighs

    January 20, 2014 at 4:12 pm

    How very interesting. It is so very true…….Everybody has a story. Our whole lives are stories and no one is exempt from sorrow. Some just get more than others.

    Everybody has a story ……….. but not everybody can write a story! How proud you must be of your father!

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • mybeautfulthings

      January 20, 2014 at 4:34 pm

      Indeed I am! I have all 13 of his books on our shelves. I fact, there are 35 as Jeremy and others are in many translations. 🙂

      Like

       
  11. Don

    January 20, 2014 at 3:34 pm

    How does one ever make sense of this?So deeply tragic. Your Dad’s novel around this sounds intriguing. It must have had a profound effect him to have written a novel about it.

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • mybeautfulthings

      January 20, 2014 at 3:47 pm

      I knew it would touch you. The novel is for teenagers but adults find it a very moving book too. It was the start of him writing 13 novels, mostly for children but a few for adults and all with an historical theme, several with tin mining at the heart of the tale.

      Like

       

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